Dr Evelyn Torsney

Tornsey

Name: Dr Evelyn Torsney, BSc (Hons), PhD
Position: Lecturer of Vascular Biology
Room: R1.236 Level 1 Jenner
Tel: +44 (0) 208 725 5091
Email: etorsney@sgul.ac.uk

Biography

Dr Evelyn Torsney obtained her Molecular Biology degree from the University of Glasgow then completed a PhD at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne. Her PhD thesis investigated ‘The Role of Endoglin in Vascular Development and Disease’ as part of a research project to understand the mechanism of disease in Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia.

Subsequent research experience at St George’s focused on aspects of vascular biology including atherosclerosis and vascular progenitor cells.

Since joining the Vascular Biology Research group with Dr Gillian Cockerill, Dr Tosrney's research has explored the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) using both animal models and patient samples.

More recently, her research has investigated the role of vascular progenitor cells in AAA. Identifying and defining subgroups of progenitor cells and their likely roles is a field which is far from fully understood. As recently reviewed these cells are variably characterised and there is no comprehensive understanding of how these cells are modulated/function in normal and diseased tissue.

Dr Torsney's interest was initially to quantify EPC in diseased versus control samples, expanding to assess progenitor cell function and how this can be modulated.

Utilising the Ang-II model of AAA, Dr Torsney is also involved in exploring the mechanisms of aneurysm initiation and the molecular and cellular events which occur, and how these translate to the human disease process.

Microarray analysis to examine regional gene expression within the vasculature is one approach, which has identified pathways and processes for further investigation. The role of TGFbeta signalling in aneurysm formation is of particular interest.

Research Interests

  • Vascular biology
  • Abdominal aortic aneurysms
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Stem cells

Key Publications

Click on the links in the references to view the abstract.

Torsney E, Xu Q. Resident vascular progenitor cells. J Mol Cell Cardiol 2011; 50(2): 304-11.

Jones A, Deb R, Torsney E, et al. Rosiglitazone reduces the development and rupture of experimental aortic aneurysms. Circulation 2009 Jun 23;119(24):3125-32.

Torsney E, Mandal K, Halliday A, Jahangiri M, Xu Q. Characterisation of progenitor cells in human atherosclerotic vessels. Atherosclerosis 2007; 191(2):259-64.

Hu Y, Zhang Z, Torsney E, Afzal AR, et al. Abundant progenitor cells in the adventitia contribute to atherosclerosis of vein grafts. J Clin Invest 2004; 113(9):1258-65.

Torsney E, Mayr U, Zou Y, et al. Thrombosis and neointima formation in vein grafts are inhibited by locally applied aspirin through endothelial protection. Circ Res 2004; 94(11):1466-73.

Torsney E, Charlton R, Diamond AG. Mouse model for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia has a generalized vascular abnormality. Circulation 2003; 107(12):1653-7.

Hu Y, Zhang Z, Torsney E, Afzal AR, et al. Abundant progenitor cells in
the adventitia contribute to atherosclerosis of vein grafts. J Clin Invest 2004; 113(9):1258-65.

Torsney E, Mayr U, Zou Y, et al. Thrombosis and neointima formation in
vein grafts are inhibited by locally applied aspirin through endothelial
protection. Circ Res 2004; 94(11):1466-73.

Torsney E, Charlton R, Diamond AG. Mouse model for hereditary
hemorrhagic telangiectasia has a generalized vascular abnormality. Circulation 2003; 107(12):1653-7.

Collaborations

  • Professor Matt Thompson, Vascular Research Institute, St George’s NHS Trust
  • Professor Juan Carlos Kaski, Director of Cardiovascular Biology Research Centre, St George's Hospital, University of London
  • Dr Jenny Tooze, Haematology, St George’s NHS Trust
  • Dr Steve Bevan, Clinical Neuroscience, St George’s, University of London
  • Prof Qingbo Xu, Kings College London

Consultancy Expertise

Funders

BHF Project Grant (Co-App)  2011-2014

Part of EU-FP7 research grant team